Jason Hunton Shares Watershed Moments

The Hunton Family has been a part of the watershed council since the beginning, and has shared numerous watershed moments with us over the last twenty years. Jason Hunton was kind enough to host us at his home and family farm, to share with us what makes this council so special to him, and such an important resource for private landowners seeking to add conservation value to the watershed we share, through meaningful projects on the land they work and steward. [Watch Video Here]

Council Celebrates 20 Years of Watershed Moments!


The Long Tom Watershed Council has spent 20 years connecting your vision for a healthier watershed to impactful projects on the ground! [Read More… ]

The success of that work has depended upon each of your many watershed moments. Moments like your hours spent volunteering counting fish or planting native shrubs, lending your voice on watershed issues at our council meetings, or your generous donations to our work. Or, most importantly, moments spent sharing your time and your love for the watershed with family, friends, neighbors and us.

This year the council celebrates 20 years of neighbors helping neighbors to enhance land and water in their community. From the timber stands to the coast range to the rich agricultural lands in the valley bottom, and our urban tributary Amazon Creek, the common value to steward our land and water has been the foundation for bridges of trust and a sense of community around the vision for a healthy Long Tom Watershed.

 

As we look ahead, we see a community….Read More… 

Help The Council Facilitate Dialogue With Tribes Regarding Traditional Knowledge in Oak and Prairie Habitats

The Long Tom Watershed Council (LTWC) is excited to announce an important opportunity for the watershed; but we need your help!

Through workshops, one-on-one conversations, and internships for Native youth, the Long Tom Watershed Council seeks to: facilitate dialogue between tribal members and partners exploring the potential to reincorporate traditional practices on the Andrew Reasoner Wildlife Preserve and Zumwalt Park near Fern Ridge; explore opportunities and interest in formalizing access for cultural practices; and inform processes for convening and formalizing relationships between tribal members and interested landowners.

The council seeks to raise $26,000 to fund the outreach and facilitation work on this project. The Spirit Mountain Community Fund has generously awarded the council with a $15,000 grant toward this project!

During the next month, the council seeks to raise the additional $11,000 necessary to complete this outreach & engagement. We are asking the watershed community to give in support of this valuable work. Will you give to this unique and meaningful project?

Click here for the full details and to give to this important work! 


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